Get that Vulfpeck vintage drum sound

First of all, if you have never heard of Vulfpeck, it’s time to get your groove education up to date and check them out on Youtube, Spotify or Bandcamp. Go check it out now, this article can wait!

For all of you still around and all of you who returned to read on: “I know!! WTF right?”… it’s truly insane. That said, let’s go and try to become better musicians ourselves by playing along to some of their songs (A great trick about using their stems coming up) and let’s try and bring in some modern sample technology to sneakily emulate their authentic vintage vibe. I almost feel guilty about trying to do this, but hey, it’s the 21st century and computers can very realisticly fake some serious vintage vibes and it’s timwe we all just accept that. Let’s go!

Step 1: Download the stems

Over on vulfstems.bandcamp.com you can download the stems (speparate tracks for each instrument) to al lot of Vulfpeck’s songs. In the video above I’m working with the song “Dean town” so at leats make sure you get that one. It’s on a ‘pay what you like’ basis but please please give them some money and don’t be cheapass!

Step 2: Load the stems into your DAW

It might be nice to solo all the track one by one, listen to what everybody plays and then at some point solo the drum track and listen closely to how they sound. That’s what we have to recreate! Sidenote: You’ll hear the bleed of other instruments in the drum mics. This song was probably recorded with everybody in the same room and therefore the drum mics picked up the other instruments.

Step 3: Get those digital vintage vibes in

You’ll need XLN audio’s Addictive drums 2 and their “Vintage Dry” kit.

Turn down the hihat

The vintage dry kit has this preset called “Puncho Rosso” which is the very first preset. All you have to do is turn down the hihat (and turn up the volume of the drum track until it’s just as loud as the original drums).

Enjoy! (If you’re not a perfectionist)

The modified Puncho Rosso preset should be more than enough to get you jamming with the other instruments. If you want you can check out this lesson about playing a disco groove for some inspiration on what to do.

Get my tailor made preset to get an even better matching sound

If you want the drum sound to resemble the original even more, consider becoming a Patron over on Patreon and you’ll not only get instant access to all the premium courses on this website, you’ll also get access to a lot of awesome drum presets made by me, including my Vulfpeck Dean Town preset. Read all about Patreon over here.

That’s it for now, stay groovy and see you next time.
Rob

Drumming with unconventional sounds

I sampled my acoustic guitar and turned it into a drumkit.

Since the launch of this project in early 2018 I got a lot of questions, ranging from “how do I set up my maschine with Ableton“, to “wtf, the video’s aren’t working” to “can you do the funky drummer“. First of all, yes I can do the funky drummer and I did a video about that that you can check out over here. But that’s not what I want to talk about in this article. I want to talk about the question I got asked the most, which always would go something like this: “Hey, supercool that you can play ‘real’ drums on a pad controller, but how about taking this thing to the next level and doing stuff with it that you cannot do on real drums?“.

Well, this video/article is about that. Kind off. It’s about creating a drumkit out of an acoustic guitar by creatively recording ad sampling it. Not something a regular drummer would do on a regular day. A regular drummer could do this however. There are midi drumkits. There’s even midi drum triggers you can put on your real drums to trigger midi sounds. So any drummer that wants to go ‘next level’ with virtual sounds, looping, etc. could do all of this as well.

And that’s kind of the thing nowadays. Anybody, playing any instrument, can take it ‘next level’ by using technology. Weither that’s a loopstation, sample triggers or any other crazy piece of technology. Everything is possible. I think that’s a good thing and I think the only thing we should always keep in mind while being little innovators taking whatever we’re doing to the next level is that in the end it should be about the music. What do we want to say? What do we want to hear? Do we want something soft, something loud, something exciting, something mellow? It doesn’t really matter how you get there as long as you’re happy with the piece of music you end up with. And I don’t care if that was created on a 17th century lute, recorded through an iphone or played on an ultra fancy 333 pad mega mpc from the future that was sent here through a time portal.

A few thoughts:
– If a maschine or mpc is normally used for programming electronic beats, is playing it as an acoustic drumkit taking it to the next level? Or another level?
– If you’ve been playing a regular drumkit up until now and you put a pair of bongo’s next to your toms and you start hitting those once in a while, is that taking it to the next level?
– If you decide you’re gonna only start making beats that do not use hi hats, is that the next level?
– If you start playing every beat you’ve ever learned backwards, is that next level?
– Is not learning any new beats for a year and instead perfecting all the beats you already know taking it next level?

I think the answer to these questions is always that it’s about what you feel like doing on any particular moment. Yes, you should be creative, yes you should try and figure out new ways to do things, but what the ‘new’ way is, is completely up to you. I believe that if you’re passionate, and you’re determined and you follow your heart, you will always end up taking something to the next level in one way or the other. 🙂

That said, enjoy this video. I loved messing around with unconventional drum sounds and I will definitely look for other ways to do ‘out of the box’ stuff like this in the future!

The beat I play ▼

Swing feel. You have to flatten your right thumb to cover two pads at the beginning of bar 4.

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How to play Reggae

Back in the day, when I was a baby, my father apparently found out this trick to make me go to sleep. He would put on some reggae music, lift me up with my head against his chest and then slowly dance around the living room to the beat of the music. A guaranteed nap time success.